Written in Blood

Ek sien jou, ek hoor jou, ek voel jou
Daagliks word daar n sluier gedra
‘N gelykheid verduister in smart
Bloed stu deur die ontworteling-
Daagliks word daar n sluier gedra
Van vroër, van nou, van self
Bloed stu deur die ontworteling
Een woord dra n duisend skerwe-
Van vroër, van nou, van self
‘N waarheid word diep versteek
Een woord dra n duisend skerwe
Tog tel die lyke ons sondes.
‘N waarheid word diep versteek
Skuld het geen perke
Tog tel die lyke ons sondes
My gewete laat my nimmer meer met rus-
Skuld het geen perke
‘N gelykheid verduister in smart
My gewete laat my nimmer meer met rus
Ek sien jou, ek hoor jou, ek voel jou
Ek is jou

Embroidered poem and bead work on a blood dyed cloth dealing with the notion of perspective, letting go and the fragility of humanity.

Blood dyed yarn

Gradients of Guilt
Yes or No.
These are usually the two options we are brought up to believe we have. Right or wrong, good or evil, acceptable or not acceptable, black or white. The knowledge or conviction of what is right or wrong is constantly being applied to our daily lives, this has also become the norm for racism.
In this woven work I show people as woven strips. In the same way as the warp and weft of a material, everything we are and do is intertwined and connected. Each strand of yarn has importance and consequence. By weaving multiple single strips, all with a unique and different pattern I am representing individual people. Because these strips are self made just as our own lives,each strip has flaws and mistakes purposefully left in to emphasize their human-like qualities. To illustrate them as a collective I decided to make all strips the same length and width. The world-wide average height of both male and female combined is 1.64m x 10cm inspired by the width of woven Ashanti strips. All are tinted a slightly different grey, representing each individuals faults and wrongdoings. However from afar all strips appear identical, accentuating that we all are equal in our guilt. Each individual strip is then hand stitched together to the next with blood dyed yarn, symbolizing the blood, anger and pain we all share as a result of any form of racist onslaughts.
Each woven strip a person
Each person to his own
Each has mistakes
From afar all the same
All connected by the pain

Woven in my Skin

The moment I glance down I am confronted with my own skin tone. Skin colour is an influential and unchangeable part of our lives as well as the root of many basic racist onslaughts. My weave represents the structure of skin as well as my attempt to cope with racism. I used a gradient of skin tone threads to fabricate the dense mélange, where together the separate yarns have interlinked and formed a new whole. Relating to the mixing of different ethnicities and the result of it. Although it appears as an entwined single yarn, every strand of yarn is separate and independent in colour and texture. Together the separate skin tones have interlinked and formed a new whole. Showing the balance of the individual and the collective. In the deeper unseen seams of the weave I used flexible red wire as the warp. It is completely concealed from sight unless one physically manipulates and pushes aside the multi-coloured weft, just as with actual skin. The red wire symbolizes our sameness in the biological and psychological sense. This skin forms around my body just as the yarns surrounds the wire. Unlike the coloured exterior, the wire and our insides can be molded by our own will. I am convinced than we can manipulate and shape our own choices and beliefs. I presume that every one of us has the ability and responsibility to continuously make the effort to determine our own lives, regardless of our inescapable skin colour.

Colour Classification

A series of instant photographs taken of a single individual wearing different skin coloured masks. With this series I intended to heighten the experience and moment that one makes a prejudgement upon someone based solely on the colour of their skin. These prejudgements aren’t always intentional or even harmful but it is something we all do and are victims of. The masks cover the individuals face fully and leaves no space for them to see out of it, representing the smothering effect your unchangeable skin colour can give you. It is something we as individuals had no choice in but inevitably has a effect in our lives. The colours of the masks were hand mixed and silk- screened in a series of 20 skin tones ranging from light to dark from the Pantone Skin-tone Guide.

All works share the same ratio linking them
closely together. Approximately 9 x 5,5 cm
The size of an Identification card